Get Ready For The Game Changer!

Do you work for or own and operate a dermatology office, medical spa, or skin aesthetics center?  If so, are you looking for new ways to revamp your consultations, get patients excited about treatments and services, and/or bring in and retain new clientele among other things?  You need to come to The Game Changer!

When you attend the Game Changer you will learn how to:

  • Change and grow your team and office culture
  • Raise your standards to eliminate competition
  • Close more consultations using skill and psychology
  • Develop new revenue streams through innovation

And be blown away by the 7 Pillars of Profit and much, much more!

The renowned Clearskin Institute of Laser Aesthetics is offering three opportunities to bring success to your practice like never before. In December, 2017 join us at our institute, and in the Summer 2018, join us two different times at the world-class Sanctuary Resort & Spa!

The upcoming session will be Saturday December 2, 2017 from 8:30 am to 5:00 pm at the Clearskin Institute of Laser Aesthetics’ very own campus.  If you can’t make it to that session, then mark your calendars for June 16 or August 25, 2017 when the Game Changer will be held at the Sanctuary Resort and Spa in Paradise Valley, AZ.

Bring yourself or colleagues from your practice!  See pricing and enroll today at https://clearskininstitute.com/gamechanger or call (602) 274-8254.

 

Inflammation Might Not Be So Bad

After your skin experiences an injury like a burn or cut, the area usually shows inflammation as part of your body’s natural healing process.  Some people might think that it isn’t a good sign, however new research shows that an area that has had inflammation in the past might heal faster after future injuries. Learn more about this in the article below.

Inflammation trains the skin to heal faster

Date: October 18, 2017
Source: Rockefeller University

Stem cells (green) migrate into a three-day-old wound to repair it. Credit: Laboratory of Mammalian Cell Biology and Development/The Rockefeller University

Scars may fade, but the skin remembers. New research from The Rockefeller University reveals that wounds or other harmful, inflammation-provoking experiences impart long-lasting memories to stem cells residing in the skin, teaching them to heal subsequent injuries faster.

These stem cells, which replenish the skin’s outer layer take their cue from inflammation, the body’s own response to injury or infection. The first bout of inflammation sensitizes these cells: the next time they sense it coming on, they respond more rapidly.

This research, described October 18 in Nature, provides the first evidence that the skin can form memories of an inflammatory response — a discovery that senior researcher Elaine Fuchs says could have major implications for better understanding and treating a range of medical conditions.

“By enhancing responsiveness to inflammation, these memories help the skin maintain its integrity, a feature that is beneficial in healing wounds after an injury,” says Fuchs, the Rebecca C. Lancefield Professor. “This memory may also have detrimental effects, however, such as contributing to the relapse of certain inflammatory disorders such as psoriasis.”

Healing memories

Whether burned by the sun, attacked by microbes, nicked by a paper cut or worse, the skin quickly becomes inflamed — red, swollen, and painful — as the body seeks to halt the damage and initiate repair.

It has long been known that the immune system maintains a memory of inflammation to mount faster responses to recurrent infections. But scientists in the Fuchs’ lab suspected that other types of long-lived cells might similarly remember inflammation. Skin was a logical place to investigate: as the body’s protective barrier, it endures frequent assaults.

It quickly became apparent that most of the cells in the skin’s outermost layer, the epithelium, don’t stick around long enough to form such memories. Instead, they migrate up through the epithelium and eventually slough off. Deeper within the epithelium, however, reside the stem cells that are responsible for continually replenishing it. These stem cells remain in place long after the skin has recovered from inflammation; and as the team found, this experience changes them.

In experiments with mice, Shruti Naik, a postdoc, and Samantha B. Larsen, a graduate student, showed that wounds closed more than twice as fast in skin that had already experienced inflammation than in skin that had never been damaged — even if that initial inflammatory experience had occurred as long as six months earlier, the equivalent of about 15 years for a human. Healing sped up, the team determined, because the inflammation-experienced stem cells were better at moving into the wound to repair the breach.

In other experiments, the researchers uncovered the basic mechanisms that rewire these cells. They showed that inflammation triggers a process that physically opens up distinct sites within the cell’s chromosomes, making certain genes accessible for activation. Some of these sites remain open long after the skin has recovered, allowing the genes to be turned on faster during a second round of inflammation.

A gene called Aim2, which encodes a “damage-and-danger” sensing protein, appeared particularly crucial: an initial bout of inflammation prompts a sustained increase in its expression. A second assault quickly activates the protein, resulting in the production of an inflammatory signal that boosts the stem cells’ ability to migrate into the wound.

A new culprit

Inflammation can sometimes run amok, as happens in autoimmune diseases like psoriasis, a disorder marked by scaly, red patches that often flare up repeatedly in the same spot. The new results suggest the skin itself could contribute to this recurring reaction.

But in fact, the implications go more than skin deep. The team’s findings may also be relevant to inflammatory disorders that affect other parts of the body, such as the linings of the gut and bowel, which, like the skin, are replenished by epithelial stem cells.

“Inflammatory diseases have long been blamed on immune cells that turn against the body. However, that is clearly not the only cause: Stem cells may also be important contributors,” Larsen says.

And because the healing capacity of stem cells diminishes with age and goes completely awry in cancer, reprogramming through inflammation may have significance for these conditions as well.

“A better understanding of how inflammation affects stem cells and other components of tissue will revolutionize our understanding of many diseases, including cancer, and likely lead to novel therapies,” Naik says.

 

Source: Rockefeller University. “Inflammation trains the skin to heal faster.” ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 18 October 2017. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/10/171018132831.htm>.

Everything You Need to Know About Microneedling

Microneedling is one of the latest facial treatments to grow in popularity. It is exactly what it sounds like – very small needles puncturing the surface of your skin. But, don’t get intimidated by that because it only feels like little pricks and it brings incredible results. We offer this treatment at the Clearskin Institute! The article below describes more about it. Give it a read and then schedule your appointment with us!

What Is Microneedling And Should You Do It?

The multi-purpose treatment targets everything from acne scars to hair loss.

By Julie Schott   Oct 18, 2017

For those looking to improve the look of scars, boost collagen, or encourage hair growth, microneedling might offer a minimally invasive solution. The practice of microneedling dates back to 1995, but it has gained significant traction in recent years thanks to new technology—and YouTube, where the mesmerizing—albeit bloody—process calls up tens of thousands of videos. Here, Yale dermatologist Macrene Alexiades, MD PhD who has published extensive research on microneedling, along with fellow Yale dermatologist Mona Gohara PhD demystify the multi-purpose treatment.

Microneedling creates microscopic punctures in the skin.

Simply put, microneedling is the insertion of very fine short needles into the skin for the purposes of rejuvenation, explains Dr. Macrene. The most popular (and cost effective) microneedling device, known as a dermaroller, is made up of micro-fine needles that range in diameter from 0.5 and 2.5 millimeters. But if the prospect of multiple needle wounds sounds slightly ominous, rest assured, the punctures are more like pin-pricks that enter only skin deep.

Microneedling offers fairly immediate results.

“From microneedling alone, you will look plump, pink and luminous for a couple of weeks. On a short-term basis, it plumps the skin and makes the skin look more radiant from inflammation and very superficial swelling,” Dr. Macrene says.

But microneedling also promises improvement over time.

According to a 2008 study, skin treated with four microneedling sessions spaced one month apart produced up to a 400% increase in collagen and elastin six months after completing treatment.

Microneedling stimulates dormant hair follicles.

Which equals new hair growth, confirms Dr. Gohara. In a recent study, 100 test subjects were divided into two groups; one set was treated with minoxidil lotion and the other received minoxidil lotion plus microneedling. After 12 weeks, 82 percent of the microneedling group reported 50 percent improvement versus 4.5 percent of the minoxidil lotion-only group.

Your dermaroller plays well with other skincare treatments.

Dr. Macrene recommends pairing microneedling with topical treatments (like her 37 Extreme Actives anti-aging cream or serum) and lasers. “Oftentimes, we use this as an opportunity to apply anti-aging preparations that will penetrate better through the needle punctures. When you combine with topicals, you have a shot at some collagen building. When combined with radiofrequency, you can see tissue tightening over the course of months,” she says. “Microneedling alone has not been shown to yield much in the way of long-term results.”

DIY microneedling is legit…

As long as it’s blessed by your dermatologist, says Dr. Gohara, who cautions those with eczema, rosacea, acne, and perioral dermatitis against rolling at home, as it might cause flare-ups. For a gentle introduction to at-home microneedling, try the Beauty Stamp from celebrity skincare guru Nurse Jamie. The handheld tool works just as the name suggests, by stamping the skin with ultra-fine pin-pricks designed to increase the efficacy of your topical treatments and boost collagen (just like a traditional dermaroller).

It’s possible to OD on microneedling.

Frequent microneedling can lead to broken capillaries “and predispose skin to a plastic look if you over abuse it with repeated microneedle insults,” says Dr. Macrene. Instead, curb dermaroller dependency by sticking to a once-a-month plan and always allow time for full recovery between roll-sessions.

Source: http://www.elle.com/beauty/makeup-skin-care/a12773502/microneedling-faq-facts-cost/

Everything You Need to Know About Microneedling

Microneedling is one of the latest facial treatments to grow in popularity. It is exactly what it sounds like – very small needles puncturing the surface of your skin. But, don’t get intimidated by that because it only feels like little pricks and it brings incredible results. We offer this treatment at the Clearskin Institute! The article below describes more about it. Give it a read and then schedule your appointment with us!

For those looking to improve the look of scars, boost collagen, or encourage hair growth, microneedling might offer a minimally invasive solution. The practice of microneedling dates back to 1995, but it has gained significant traction in recent years thanks to new technology?and YouTube, where the mesmerizing?albeit bloody?process calls up tens of thousands of videos. Here, Yale dermatologist Macrene Alexiades, MD PhD who has published extensive research on microneedling, along with fellow Yale dermatologist Mona Gohara PhD demystify the multi-purpose treatment.

Advertisement – Continue Reading Below

Microneedling creates microscopic punctures in the skin.

Simply put, microneedling is the insertion of very fine short needles into the skin for the purposes of rejuvenation, explains Dr. Macrene. The most popular (and cost effective) microneedling device, known as a dermaroller, is made up of micro-fine needles that range in diameter from 0.5 and 2.5 millimeters. But if the prospect of multiple needle wounds sounds slightly ominous, rest assured, the punctures are more like pin-pricks that enter only skin deep.

Microneedling offers fairly immediate results.

“From microneedling alone, you will look plump, pink and luminous for a couple of weeks. On a short-term basis, it plumps the skin and makes the skin look more radiant from inflammation and very superficial swelling,” Dr. Macrene says.

But microneedling also promises improvement over time.

According to a 2008 study, skin treated with four microneedling sessions spaced one month apart produced up to a 400% increase in collagen and elastin six months after completing treatment.

Microneedling stimulates dormant hair follicles.

Which equals new hair growth, confirms Dr. Gohara. In a recent study, 100 test subjects were divided into two groups; one set was treated with minoxidil lotion and the other received minoxidil lotion plus microneedling. After 12 weeks, 82 percent of the microneedling group reported 50 percent improvement versus 4.5 percent of the minoxidil lotion-only group.

Your dermaroller plays well with other skincare treatments.

Dr. Macrene recommends pairing microneedling with topical treatments (like her 37 Extreme Actives anti-aging cream or serum) and lasers. “Oftentimes, we use this as an opportunity to apply anti-aging preparations that will penetrate better through the needle punctures. When you combine with topicals, you have a shot at some collagen building. When combined with radiofrequency, you can see tissue tightening over the course of months,” she says. “Microneedling alone has not been shown to yield much in the way of long-term results.”

Advertisement – Continue Reading Below

DIY microneedling is legit…

As long as it’s blessed by your dermatologist, says Dr. Gohara, who cautions those with eczema, rosacea, acne, and perioral dermatitis against rolling at home, as it might cause flare-ups. For a gentle introduction to at-home microneedling, try the Beauty Stamp from celebrity skincare guru Nurse Jamie. The handheld tool works just as the name suggests, by stamping the skin with ultra-fine pin-pricks designed to increase the efficacy of your topical treatments and boost collagen (just like a traditional dermaroller).

It’s possible to OD on microneedling.

Frequent microneedling can lead to broken capillaries “and predispose skin to a plastic look if you over abuse it with repeated microneedle insults,” says Dr. Macrene. Instead, curb dermaroller dependency by sticking to a once-a-month plan and always allow time for full recovery between roll-sessions .

Source: http://www.elle.com/beauty/makeup-skin-care/a12773502/microneedling-faq-facts-cost/