Botox For TMJ

A lot of people have temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disoder which affects the jaw bones and muscles around it. If left untreated, TMJ can contribute to headaches and migraines. The good news is that there are many different things people can try to find relief from TMJ, including botox. The story below is one writer’s personal account of getting botox for TMJ pain. It goes to show that botox is good for more than hiding wrinkles! Learn about this use for botox in the story below.

My crash course into the mysterious world of Temporomandibular joint disorder began one fateful fall evening, during my junior year of college. The day started off, as usual, packed with classes and followed by a seven-hour shift at one of my two part-time jobs. What began as a dull ache early in the day, suddenly turned into a searing hot pain that shot through my head as the lights from oncoming traffic flashed across my field of vision during my drive home. It was my first migraine.

At that point, I’d been experiencing jaw pain for a while but didn’t ever associate the two. Soon after the migraine hit, my jaw became so swollen and lopsided that I decided to go to a doctor who thought I had a lump that needed a biopsy. Turns out, I had a super-strong masseter muscle (the muscle that helps facilitate chewing) after years of stress-induced clenching, which was like weight-lifting my jaw muscles for eight hours every night. Many doctor’s visits, X-rays, and CAT scans later one doctor said, “You might have TMJ.” It wasn’t definitive, but at least it was something to work with. 
 
What’s TMJ? The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is where the jaw bone (mandible) connects to the skull (temporal bone). “When people say TMJ, they are often referring to pain or discomfort anywhere along the jaw, which may also include some neck muscles,” says Jennifer P. Bassiur, doctor and director of the Center for Oral, Facial and Head Pain at Columbia University. But because the pain isn’t just located at the joint, a more accurate term for the condition may actually be “TMD,” or temporomandibular disorder. This refers to the conditions involving pain or dysfunction in the jaw point and/or surrounding tissues, she says.

The National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research estimates that more than 10 million Americans are affected by the disorder, reporting pain in and around the ear and jaw ? on one or both sides of the face ? as well as headache, tension, inability to open and close the mouth comfortably, and painful clicking, popping, or grinding sounds when speaking, chewing, or yawning.

Curing, well, managing, TMD first depends on identifying the underlying cause. For me, it was clenching, which only worsened when I was stressed (i.e. always). For TMD, doctors advise avoiding sticky or chewy foods (like gum), applying ice and/or heat to the jaw, medications (steroids, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatories, and muscle relaxants), a custom-fitted orthotic that fits over the upper or lower teeth, injections into the muscle or joints, physical therapy, cognitive behavioral therapy, or in severe cases, surgical intervention may be required.

And, unfortunately, TMD is often a chronic condition. There’s no cure for my pain. After attempting several treatments, I decided to get a night guard and start what I affectionately refer to as “the mush diet,” which is exactly what it sounds like ? eating without chewing. I had a bit of relief (and an excuse to eat avocados and smoothies all day), but I knew the diet would only be short-lived because eventually I wanted to, well, chew while eating. I’d lost all hope until I was working on an article with New York City-based plastic surgeon David Shafer, when our conversation turned to my horrible TMJ.

“You know, Botox is good for that,” he told me. “I’ve injected patients (and myself), and there’s relief from the pain and swelling. Shafer explained that eight years ago, he went to Japan with Allergan (the makers of Botox) to help teach the doctors U.S. techniques. During his time there, he noticed doctors were injecting Botox into the jaw to slim the lower part of the face. But a happy accident occurred after patients started reporting that they felt relief from jaw pain. By injecting directly into the muscle, Shafer says, Botox limits muscle function, and decreases TMD symptoms. Thrilled at the chance to (gently) sink my teeth into a new remedy ? without the pain, swelling, and a lopsided jaw ? I immediately booked an appointment with Shafer and began researching this new treatment.

As it turns out, the treatment isn’t that new in other countries, according to Melissa Kanchanapoomi Levin, a board-certified dermatologist and clinical professor at New York University Langone and Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City. “I grew up in Thailand and saw Botox being injected into hypertrophic masseter muscles over 15 years ago,” she tells Allure. “Asian aesthetics sometimes will favor an ovoid facial shape that can be accomplished either by surgical reduction or botulinum toxin, which offers a less invasive approach.”

Kanchanapoomi Levin injects Botox into the masseter muscle for two reasons. For those like me, who experience chronic facial muscle pain and headaches from persistent grinding/clenching, Botox can relax the muscles involved and relieve pain, and people with an enlarged muscle near the angle of the jaw for sculpting the lower face. She also notes that although there are more than 600 studies evaluating injecting botulinum toxin into the masseter muscle, this treatment is not approved by the Food and Drug Administration and is considered an off-label indication.

If it is performed by someone that doesn’t know what they are doing you can have functional impairment, pain, spasms, lockjaw, and difficulty chewing, Kanchanapoomi Levin says. It’s important to go to a board-certified dermatologist or facial plastic surgeon who understands the anatomy, is well-trained, and performs this procedure routinely.

Sitting in the chair at Shafer’s office, armed with my new arsenal of knowledge, a wave of fear hits me. The thought of injecting a toxin that will cause partial muscle paralysis in my jaw is terrifying. Shafer assures me that the procedure will be just three little injections on each side of my jaw, and swelling or bruising occurs in less than 1 percent of his patients. I hardly felt the tiny injections in my jaw and have no visible mark.

Now, following the procedure, I sometimes notice my jaw getting tired while chewing gum ? something I haven’t been able to do in years, so I’m okay with that. “One of the great things about Botox is, if for whatever reason you don’t like it, it goes away,” says Shafer. “But one of the bad things about Botox is, if you like it, it still goes away.”

Generally, Botox lasts anywhere from three to five months, depending on how each person metabolizes it. As for how quickly I can expect relief, when Botox is used for cosmetic purposes, it’s injected into smaller muscles so it works quickly. The masseter muscle is much larger, so it may take up to one to two weeks.

After one week, I notice that my headaches are not as frequent and my jaw hurts less, but it’s still swollen and lopsided. By week two, I’m sleeping better and can chew real food without wanting to rip my face off. I still have some swelling and occasional pain, which Shafer explains will get better over time. Since it took many years to create this issue, I am excited to see such a big change after only one treatment. Who would have thought that the life-changing solution to my chronic TMJ pain would be Botox? Spoiler alert: Not me.


For more Botox:

Now, watch as a dermatologist explains lip injections:

Source: https://www.allure.com/story/botox-injections-for-tmj

Get Ready For The Game Changer!

Do you work for or own and operate a dermatology office, medical spa, or skin aesthetics center?  If so, are you looking for new ways to revamp your consultations, get patients excited about treatments and services, and/or bring in and retain new clientele among other things?  You need to come to The Game Changer!

When you attend the Game Changer you will learn how to:

  • Change and grow your team and office culture
  • Raise your standards to eliminate competition
  • Close more consultations using skill and psychology
  • Develop new revenue streams through innovation

And be blown away by the 7 Pillars of Profit and much, much more!

The renowned Clearskin Institute of Laser Aesthetics is offering three opportunities to bring success to your practice like never before. In December, 2017 join us at our institute, and in the Summer 2018, join us two different times at the world-class Sanctuary Resort & Spa!

The upcoming session will be Saturday December 2, 2017 from 8:30 am to 5:00 pm at the Clearskin Institute of Laser Aesthetics’ very own campus.  If you can’t make it to that session, then mark your calendars for June 16 or August 25, 2017 when the Game Changer will be held at the Sanctuary Resort and Spa in Paradise Valley, AZ.

Bring yourself or colleagues from your practice!  See pricing and enroll today at https://clearskininstitute.com/gamechanger or call (602) 274-8254.

 

Inflammation Might Not Be So Bad

After your skin experiences an injury like a burn or cut, the area usually shows inflammation as part of your body’s natural healing process.  Some people might think that it isn’t a good sign, however new research shows that an area that has had inflammation in the past might heal faster after future injuries. Learn more about this in the article below.

Inflammation trains the skin to heal faster

Date: October 18, 2017
Source: Rockefeller University

Stem cells (green) migrate into a three-day-old wound to repair it. Credit: Laboratory of Mammalian Cell Biology and Development/The Rockefeller University

Scars may fade, but the skin remembers. New research from The Rockefeller University reveals that wounds or other harmful, inflammation-provoking experiences impart long-lasting memories to stem cells residing in the skin, teaching them to heal subsequent injuries faster.

These stem cells, which replenish the skin’s outer layer take their cue from inflammation, the body’s own response to injury or infection. The first bout of inflammation sensitizes these cells: the next time they sense it coming on, they respond more rapidly.

This research, described October 18 in Nature, provides the first evidence that the skin can form memories of an inflammatory response — a discovery that senior researcher Elaine Fuchs says could have major implications for better understanding and treating a range of medical conditions.

“By enhancing responsiveness to inflammation, these memories help the skin maintain its integrity, a feature that is beneficial in healing wounds after an injury,” says Fuchs, the Rebecca C. Lancefield Professor. “This memory may also have detrimental effects, however, such as contributing to the relapse of certain inflammatory disorders such as psoriasis.”

Healing memories

Whether burned by the sun, attacked by microbes, nicked by a paper cut or worse, the skin quickly becomes inflamed — red, swollen, and painful — as the body seeks to halt the damage and initiate repair.

It has long been known that the immune system maintains a memory of inflammation to mount faster responses to recurrent infections. But scientists in the Fuchs’ lab suspected that other types of long-lived cells might similarly remember inflammation. Skin was a logical place to investigate: as the body’s protective barrier, it endures frequent assaults.

It quickly became apparent that most of the cells in the skin’s outermost layer, the epithelium, don’t stick around long enough to form such memories. Instead, they migrate up through the epithelium and eventually slough off. Deeper within the epithelium, however, reside the stem cells that are responsible for continually replenishing it. These stem cells remain in place long after the skin has recovered from inflammation; and as the team found, this experience changes them.

In experiments with mice, Shruti Naik, a postdoc, and Samantha B. Larsen, a graduate student, showed that wounds closed more than twice as fast in skin that had already experienced inflammation than in skin that had never been damaged — even if that initial inflammatory experience had occurred as long as six months earlier, the equivalent of about 15 years for a human. Healing sped up, the team determined, because the inflammation-experienced stem cells were better at moving into the wound to repair the breach.

In other experiments, the researchers uncovered the basic mechanisms that rewire these cells. They showed that inflammation triggers a process that physically opens up distinct sites within the cell’s chromosomes, making certain genes accessible for activation. Some of these sites remain open long after the skin has recovered, allowing the genes to be turned on faster during a second round of inflammation.

A gene called Aim2, which encodes a “damage-and-danger” sensing protein, appeared particularly crucial: an initial bout of inflammation prompts a sustained increase in its expression. A second assault quickly activates the protein, resulting in the production of an inflammatory signal that boosts the stem cells’ ability to migrate into the wound.

A new culprit

Inflammation can sometimes run amok, as happens in autoimmune diseases like psoriasis, a disorder marked by scaly, red patches that often flare up repeatedly in the same spot. The new results suggest the skin itself could contribute to this recurring reaction.

But in fact, the implications go more than skin deep. The team’s findings may also be relevant to inflammatory disorders that affect other parts of the body, such as the linings of the gut and bowel, which, like the skin, are replenished by epithelial stem cells.

“Inflammatory diseases have long been blamed on immune cells that turn against the body. However, that is clearly not the only cause: Stem cells may also be important contributors,” Larsen says.

And because the healing capacity of stem cells diminishes with age and goes completely awry in cancer, reprogramming through inflammation may have significance for these conditions as well.

“A better understanding of how inflammation affects stem cells and other components of tissue will revolutionize our understanding of many diseases, including cancer, and likely lead to novel therapies,” Naik says.

 

Source: Rockefeller University. “Inflammation trains the skin to heal faster.” ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 18 October 2017. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/10/171018132831.htm>.

Everything You Need to Know About Microneedling

Microneedling is one of the latest facial treatments to grow in popularity. It is exactly what it sounds like – very small needles puncturing the surface of your skin. But, don’t get intimidated by that because it only feels like little pricks and it brings incredible results. We offer this treatment at the Clearskin Institute! The article below describes more about it. Give it a read and then schedule your appointment with us!

What Is Microneedling And Should You Do It?

The multi-purpose treatment targets everything from acne scars to hair loss.

By Julie Schott   Oct 18, 2017

For those looking to improve the look of scars, boost collagen, or encourage hair growth, microneedling might offer a minimally invasive solution. The practice of microneedling dates back to 1995, but it has gained significant traction in recent years thanks to new technology—and YouTube, where the mesmerizing—albeit bloody—process calls up tens of thousands of videos. Here, Yale dermatologist Macrene Alexiades, MD PhD who has published extensive research on microneedling, along with fellow Yale dermatologist Mona Gohara PhD demystify the multi-purpose treatment.

Microneedling creates microscopic punctures in the skin.

Simply put, microneedling is the insertion of very fine short needles into the skin for the purposes of rejuvenation, explains Dr. Macrene. The most popular (and cost effective) microneedling device, known as a dermaroller, is made up of micro-fine needles that range in diameter from 0.5 and 2.5 millimeters. But if the prospect of multiple needle wounds sounds slightly ominous, rest assured, the punctures are more like pin-pricks that enter only skin deep.

Microneedling offers fairly immediate results.

“From microneedling alone, you will look plump, pink and luminous for a couple of weeks. On a short-term basis, it plumps the skin and makes the skin look more radiant from inflammation and very superficial swelling,” Dr. Macrene says.

But microneedling also promises improvement over time.

According to a 2008 study, skin treated with four microneedling sessions spaced one month apart produced up to a 400% increase in collagen and elastin six months after completing treatment.

Microneedling stimulates dormant hair follicles.

Which equals new hair growth, confirms Dr. Gohara. In a recent study, 100 test subjects were divided into two groups; one set was treated with minoxidil lotion and the other received minoxidil lotion plus microneedling. After 12 weeks, 82 percent of the microneedling group reported 50 percent improvement versus 4.5 percent of the minoxidil lotion-only group.

Your dermaroller plays well with other skincare treatments.

Dr. Macrene recommends pairing microneedling with topical treatments (like her 37 Extreme Actives anti-aging cream or serum) and lasers. “Oftentimes, we use this as an opportunity to apply anti-aging preparations that will penetrate better through the needle punctures. When you combine with topicals, you have a shot at some collagen building. When combined with radiofrequency, you can see tissue tightening over the course of months,” she says. “Microneedling alone has not been shown to yield much in the way of long-term results.”

DIY microneedling is legit…

As long as it’s blessed by your dermatologist, says Dr. Gohara, who cautions those with eczema, rosacea, acne, and perioral dermatitis against rolling at home, as it might cause flare-ups. For a gentle introduction to at-home microneedling, try the Beauty Stamp from celebrity skincare guru Nurse Jamie. The handheld tool works just as the name suggests, by stamping the skin with ultra-fine pin-pricks designed to increase the efficacy of your topical treatments and boost collagen (just like a traditional dermaroller).

It’s possible to OD on microneedling.

Frequent microneedling can lead to broken capillaries “and predispose skin to a plastic look if you over abuse it with repeated microneedle insults,” says Dr. Macrene. Instead, curb dermaroller dependency by sticking to a once-a-month plan and always allow time for full recovery between roll-sessions.

Source: http://www.elle.com/beauty/makeup-skin-care/a12773502/microneedling-faq-facts-cost/

Everything You Need to Know About Microneedling

Microneedling is one of the latest facial treatments to grow in popularity. It is exactly what it sounds like – very small needles puncturing the surface of your skin. But, don’t get intimidated by that because it only feels like little pricks and it brings incredible results. We offer this treatment at the Clearskin Institute! The article below describes more about it. Give it a read and then schedule your appointment with us!

For those looking to improve the look of scars, boost collagen, or encourage hair growth, microneedling might offer a minimally invasive solution. The practice of microneedling dates back to 1995, but it has gained significant traction in recent years thanks to new technology?and YouTube, where the mesmerizing?albeit bloody?process calls up tens of thousands of videos. Here, Yale dermatologist Macrene Alexiades, MD PhD who has published extensive research on microneedling, along with fellow Yale dermatologist Mona Gohara PhD demystify the multi-purpose treatment.

Advertisement – Continue Reading Below

Microneedling creates microscopic punctures in the skin.

Simply put, microneedling is the insertion of very fine short needles into the skin for the purposes of rejuvenation, explains Dr. Macrene. The most popular (and cost effective) microneedling device, known as a dermaroller, is made up of micro-fine needles that range in diameter from 0.5 and 2.5 millimeters. But if the prospect of multiple needle wounds sounds slightly ominous, rest assured, the punctures are more like pin-pricks that enter only skin deep.

Microneedling offers fairly immediate results.

“From microneedling alone, you will look plump, pink and luminous for a couple of weeks. On a short-term basis, it plumps the skin and makes the skin look more radiant from inflammation and very superficial swelling,” Dr. Macrene says.

But microneedling also promises improvement over time.

According to a 2008 study, skin treated with four microneedling sessions spaced one month apart produced up to a 400% increase in collagen and elastin six months after completing treatment.

Microneedling stimulates dormant hair follicles.

Which equals new hair growth, confirms Dr. Gohara. In a recent study, 100 test subjects were divided into two groups; one set was treated with minoxidil lotion and the other received minoxidil lotion plus microneedling. After 12 weeks, 82 percent of the microneedling group reported 50 percent improvement versus 4.5 percent of the minoxidil lotion-only group.

Your dermaroller plays well with other skincare treatments.

Dr. Macrene recommends pairing microneedling with topical treatments (like her 37 Extreme Actives anti-aging cream or serum) and lasers. “Oftentimes, we use this as an opportunity to apply anti-aging preparations that will penetrate better through the needle punctures. When you combine with topicals, you have a shot at some collagen building. When combined with radiofrequency, you can see tissue tightening over the course of months,” she says. “Microneedling alone has not been shown to yield much in the way of long-term results.”

Advertisement – Continue Reading Below

DIY microneedling is legit…

As long as it’s blessed by your dermatologist, says Dr. Gohara, who cautions those with eczema, rosacea, acne, and perioral dermatitis against rolling at home, as it might cause flare-ups. For a gentle introduction to at-home microneedling, try the Beauty Stamp from celebrity skincare guru Nurse Jamie. The handheld tool works just as the name suggests, by stamping the skin with ultra-fine pin-pricks designed to increase the efficacy of your topical treatments and boost collagen (just like a traditional dermaroller).

It’s possible to OD on microneedling.

Frequent microneedling can lead to broken capillaries “and predispose skin to a plastic look if you over abuse it with repeated microneedle insults,” says Dr. Macrene. Instead, curb dermaroller dependency by sticking to a once-a-month plan and always allow time for full recovery between roll-sessions .

Source: http://www.elle.com/beauty/makeup-skin-care/a12773502/microneedling-faq-facts-cost/

Counterfeit Fillers

Fillers and Botox are getting more and more popular. There are plenty of brands like Juvederm, Kybella, Dysport and more that are extremely well known and widely used. However, like anything else in the beauty industry, there are counterfeit fillers than can cause serious issues if used. We recommend reading this article about warning signs and doing your own research before going under the needle.

To put it bluntly, deciding on getting fillers or Botox is a BFD. Between the endless research and choosing a trusted physician, there’s a lot to consider. Throw in the fact that there’s a possibility your injectables could very well be counterfeit (it’s a very rare but real scenario), could make the process a little more complicated (and dangerous). “There’s, allegedly, illegally imported Botox that you can get from other countries here in the U.S. market,” says Joseph O’Connell, a plastic surgeon based in Westport, Connecticut. Here, five ways to tell if your filler is fake ? and what to do when it is.

1. Make an appointment with a board-certified professional.

The simplest way to avoid treatment with a fake filler is to have the treatment done by a board-certified facial plastic surgeon, plastic surgeon, or dermatologist, says Min Ahn, a facial plastic surgeon in Boston. “Ideally, this person has either been recommended by someone you trust or has a stellar online reputation,” he says. A quick Google search can pull up whether or not your doctor of choice is certified with the state board of registration in medicine.

2. Ask to see the box the filler came in.

“If you’re getting Botox, ask to see the box it comes in,” says O’Connell. “There’s a hologram on the box.” But, says Ahn, the typical consumer may not be able to tell the authenticity of the box, so it’s important to have an open dialogue with your doctor.

3. Pricing is important.

Typically, if filler or Botox is super marked down in price, there’s a good chance it’s a phony, says Ahn. “If the treatment is unusually inexpensive, you should wonder ? it’s almost too good to be true,” he says. Adds O’Connell: “[Doctors] all pay close to the same price for Botox ? we all have to buy it from the company.”

4. Check your symptoms.

If, during your treatment, there’s unusual pain, you should be wary of the filler’s authenticity, says Ahn. Other side effects to be on the lookout for are: “persistent redness with swelling, deeply colored bruising of the skin (which may indicate blockage of a blood vessel or soft tissue), and hard, irregular contours,” explains Ahn. “Any medical emergency, such as an infection or reaction that may affect sensation, vision or function should be treated immediately.”

5. Get help.

If you feel as if you’re experiencing the above side effects, return to the medical professional who injected you for a post-treatment examination. “If you are not satisfied with the answers, you can obtain a copy of the records and seek help from another doctor,” says Ahn. “Ultimately, the only recourse, after the incident has resolved, may be with the medical board.”


For more on injections:


Now, watch as a dermatologist explains lip injections:

Follow Sarah on Twitter and Instagram.

Source: https://www.allure.com/story/counterfeit-botox-side-effects

Dermaplaning 101

For some women, facial hair is embarrassing and a contributor to low self esteem. There have always been plenty of methods out there to remove unwanted hair, but some are not as effective as others. The latest method is called dermaplaning. Many medical spas offer this service, and besides hair-free, it leaves skin looking better overall. Learn how it works in the article below.

I’ve always wanted to remove all the hair from my face. I contemplated lasers, but because my skin has too much melanin, it could cause hyperpigmentation. Instead I’ve been waxing, tweezing, and Nair-ing for years. That was, until I discovered dermaplaning.

Dermaplaning is a skin care treatment that removes dead skin cells and vellus hair, aka peach fuzz. An aesthetician uses a small, sterile blade while holding the skin taut, swiping the blade in gentle upward motions.

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A few weeks ago, I visited

Stacked Skincare

to try dermaplaning for myself. The treatment got rid of my gnarly sideburns with just a few passes?and best of all, it’s painless. It felt quite relaxing, actually, like little baby hands running across my face.

@shotbykvng

“Dermaplaning leaves your skin brighter, smoother, glowing, and more youthful,” says Stacked Skincare founder Kerry Benjamin. “The only people who can’t dermaplane are those with active pustular acne.”

Here, Benjamin breaks down everything there is to know about dermaplaning, the Stacked Skincare method, and getting your smoothest skin ever at home.

Dermaplaning goes beyond a basic shave

The procedure involves the use of a 10-inch scalpel, which curves into a sharp point. The blade is used on clean, dry skin on the forehead, cheeks, chin, nose and neck. “You can expect to see an instant improvement in skin texture and tone, while the long-term effects are increased cell turnover, fewer wrinkles and dark spots, reduction of acne scarring, and the removal of fine facial hair,” Benjamin says.

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@shotbykvng

Hairless skin is the cleanest

Removing the peach fuzz is beneficial since the fine hairs trap debris and oils and give skin a dull look. “After dermaplaning, skin care products and treatments perform much more efficiently since they can penetrate the skin more easily. Your makeup goes on smoother as well,” explains Benjamin. “It’s the perfect procedure to begin stacking other treatments, like our TCA Multi Acid Face Peel, Serums, and MicroRoller.”

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Stacking is exfoliation on steroids

Step one: Slough off dead, dry skin with a combination of chemical exfoliation (aka a chemical peel). “Combined exfoliation treatments promote healthy skin cell turnover, prevent acne, reduce dark spots and blemishes, and boost collagen production for plumper skin.”

Step two: Cocktail two or more serums. “When stacked together, the active ingredients in our serums work synergistically to address multiple problematic skin symptoms at once.”

Step three: Dermaplaning, microneedling, and microdermabrasion.

@shotbykvng

Advertisement – Continue Reading Below

Maintenance is a major key

“I always tell my clients that they can’t just treat their skin when they see me?they have to do it at home too,” Benjamin says. At-home peels between professional treatments can really boost and maintain your results. “If you are battling acne, a peel will gently exfoliate, kill acne-causing bacteria, and calm inflammation,” says Benjamin, who sends clients home with her TCA Multi Acid Face and Body Peel. “In addition to being a deeper, non-abrasive exfoliation, peels can hydrate, lift hyperpigmentation, and speed up cell turnover, all revealing brighter, healthier, more glowing skin.”

Photographer: Kevin Gonzaez (@shotbykvng)

Source: http://www.elle.com/beauty/hair/news/a37596/dermaplaning-facial-hair-removal/

Beware of Imposter Fillers/Injections

In the past few years, beauty trends have shifted (like they always do over time) towards emphasizing certain features like defined cheek bones, distinct eyebrows and full lips. No two sets of lips are created equal, however. Some people have naturally full lips while others have less noticeable lips. For those who have the latter that want fuller lips there are fillers and injections that can get the job done, as most of us know. Unfortunately, not all fillers are created equally either. The article below warns of the potential dangers knock-off/imposter fillers can cause. If you have been wanting to alter your lips be sure to do your research and consult your trusted medical professional first.

Lip fillers ? pout-plumping injections given by your derm ? are super popular (just call it the Kylie Jenner Effect. It?s easy to see why: one speedy in-office injection and you can walk out with more luscious lips. But that doesn?t mean things can?t go wrong, as one dermatologist wants us all to be aware of.

Dr. Miray, a dermatologist in Oslo reposted a before and after photo of lip fillers gone wrong. “This post is for all of you looking for a cheap, quick fix and do not research your injector nor the substance that you are getting injected in your body,? she wrote.

The photo shows the results of an excision ? a.k.a. the surgical removal of fillers. Typically, when you?re after a fuller pout, a dermatologist will inject your lips with hyaluronic acid fillers, which are dissolvable plumpers that fade naturally over time. Dermatologists use a variety of formulations with HA molecules of different sizes to fine-tune a natural end result. In the rare event HA fillers are botched or you just don?t like the look, you can even have them safely dissolved on the spot.

Dr. Miray?s post shows what can happen when you get biopolymer implants. ?Biopolymers are a gel-like implant (‘liquid silicone’) that non-professionals inject in the buttocks, hips, breasts, lips ? you name it. It may lead to severe pain, compromised health, tissue death, and even death of the patient,? she wrote. ?As far as I know, there are not many doctors performing this procedure with good results. For lips, I only recommend non-permanent fillers that are dissolvable.”

According to an article by New Beauty, silicone injections aren?t FDA-approved in the U.S. ? but some doctors and other med spas still use them.

So how do you avoid a case of lip fillers gone wrong? First off, know your dermatologist, says Dr. Miray. ?Do not trust anyone blindly just because they have a medical title.? Secondly, talk to your dermatologist before any procedure about exactly what they?ll be injecting and the risks. ?Make sure the package is opened in front of you (NOT saved in the fridge for later touch ups!),? wrote Dr. Miray.

Dermatologists agree: if you?re going for lip fillers, it?s HA all the way.


For more filler news:


Source: https://www.allure.com/story/why-you-should-never-get-cheap-lip-injections

How Hair Follicles Grow

Ever wonder how hair actually grows on the body, and more specifically how skin functions in this process?  As certified laser technicians (or future technicians) understanding this concept could be you a better, more effective laser technician given that a HUGE use of lasers is for hair removal.  Researchers and scientists at the University of Southern California have studied how hair follicles develop in the skin and how hair grows from them.  Check out the article below from Science Daily that gives their findings and more useful information.

‘How to’ guide for producing hair follicles

Date: August 11, 2017
Source: University of Southern California – Health Sciences
Summary: How does the skin develop follicles and eventually sprout hair? A new
study addresses this question using insights gleaned from organoids, 3-D
assemblies of cells possessing rudimentary skin structure and function
— including the ability to grow hair.

How does the skin develop follicles and eventually sprout hair? A USC-led study, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
(PNAS), addresses this question using insights gleaned from organoids,
3D assemblies of cells possessing rudimentary skin structure and
function — including the ability to grow hair.

In the study, first author Mingxing Lei, a postdoctoral scholar in
the USC Stem Cell laboratory of Cheng-Ming Chuong, and an international
team of scientists started with dissociated skin cells from a newborn
mouse. Lei then took hundreds of timelapse movies to analyze the
collective cell behavior. They observed that these cells formed
organoids by transitioning through six distinct phases: 1) dissociated
cells; 2) aggregated cells; 3) cysts; 4) coalesced cysts; 5) layered
skin; and 6) skin with follicles, which robustly produce hair after
being transplanted onto the back of a host mouse.


In contrast, dissociated skin cells from an adult mouse only reached
phase 2 — aggregation — before stalling in their development and
failing to produce hair.


To understand the forces at play, the scientists analyzed the
molecular events and physical processes that drove successful organoid
formation with newborn mouse cells.


“We used a combination of bioinformatics and molecular screenings,
and the core facilities at the Health Sciences Campus have facilitated
my analyses,” said Lei.


At various time points, they observed increased activity in genes
related to: the protein collagen; the blood sugar-regulating hormone
insulin; the formation of cellular sheets; the adhesion, death or
differentiation of cells; and many other processes. In addition to
determining which genes were active and when, the scientists also
determined where in the organoid this activity took place. Next, they
blocked the activity of specific genes to confirm their roles in
organoid development.

By carefully studying these developmental processes, the scientists
obtained a molecular “how to” guide for driving individual skin cells to
self-organize into organoids that can produce hair. They then applied
this “how to” guide to the stalled organoids derived from adult mouse
skin cells. By providing the right molecular and genetic cues in the
proper sequence, they were able to stimulate these adult organoids to
continue their development and eventually produce hair. In fact, the
adult organoids produced 40 percent as much hair as the newborn
organoids — a significant improvement.


“Normally, many aging individuals do not grow hair well, because
adult cells gradually lose their regenerative ability,” said Chuong,
senior author, USC Stem Cell principal investigator and professor of
pathology at the Keck School of Medicine of USC. “With our new findings,
we are able to make adult mouse cells produce hair again. In the
future, this work can inspire a strategy for stimulating hair growth in
patients with conditions ranging from alopecia to baldness.”


Additional co-authors include: Chao-Yuan Yeh, Ping Wu, Ting-Xin
Jiang, and Randall Bruce Widelitz from USC; Linus J. Schumacher from the
University of Oxford and Imperial College, London; Ruth E. Baker from
the University of Oxford; Yung-Chi Lai from China Medical University;
Wen-Tau Juan from China Medical University and Academia Sinica, Taipei;
and Li Yang from Chongqing University.


Most of the experimental work was supported by U.S. federal funding
from the National Institutes of Health (AR42177 and AR60306). The
multi-disciplinary team members were also supported by nine non-U.S.
sources: the China Postdoctoral Science Foundation (2016M590866);
Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities
(106112015CDJRC231206); Special Funding for Postdoctoral Research
Projects in Chongqing (Xm2015093); the China Scholarship Council
(2011605042); the Innovation and Attracting Talents Program for College
and University (111 project grant B06023); the National Nature Science
Foundation of China (11532004 and 31270990); the Academia Sinica
Research Project on Nanoscience and Technology; the Ministry of Science
and Technology of Taiwan; and the UK Engineering and Physical Sciences
Research Council (EP/F500394/1).


Story Source:

Materials provided by University of Southern California – Health Sciences. Original written by Cristy Lytal. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Mingxing Lei, Linus J. Schumacher, Yung-Chih Lai, Wen-Tau Juan,
    Chao-Yuan Yeh, Ping Wu, Ting-Xin Jiang, Ruth E. Baker, Randall Bruce
    Widelitz, Li Yang, Cheng-Ming Chuong. Self-organization process in newborn skin organoid formation inspires strategy to restore hair regeneration of adult cells. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 2017; 201700475 DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1700475114

Source: University of Southern California – Health Sciences. “‘How to’ guide for
producing hair follicles.” ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 11 August 2017.
<www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/08/170811183833.htm>.

New Impressive Face Masks

We are all about new products that will boost your beauty and the appearance of your skin. Face masks are a great option to give your skin a much needed break and reset. According to Elle Magazine the products listed below are some of the best mask you can get your hands on these days. Check them out and give them a try!

Our editors share their favorite moisture-packing, pore-shrinking, humanity-restoring face masks that get their skin as close to perfection as possible (or as one editor describes, Cate Blanchett).

Tatcha Violet-C Radiance Mask

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“I stan pretty hard for Tatcha. From their cleansing oils to their ACTUAL gold-spun products, they can do no wrong in my eyes. This goes for their masks too, and their latest is a doozy. I love anything with Vitamin C, and this formula brightens up my skin as soon as I do that dramatic yet useless face-splash-over-the-sink thing actresses in commercials always do. This also comes in the most delightful shade of lavender, making it difficult to not post to your stories.”? Justine Carreon, ELLE.com Associate Market Editor

Tatcha Violet-C Radiance Mask, $68; sephora.com


SK-II Facial Treatment Mask

“I can disembark a 12-hour flight with a face like an old hot dog (as I often do), then slap one of these miracle-workers on for 20 minutes and presto?my humanity is restored. Not only does this mask, which is drenched in the brand’s signature pitera, impart a certain lit-from-within radiance (see: Cate Blanchett), it also moisturizes and firms, making it the ultimate complexion-revitalizing trifecta?and one of my top 5 most-hoardable beauty products ever.”? April Long, Executive Beauty Editor

SK-II Facial Treatment Mask, $135; nordstrom.com


Tonymoly Master Lab Sheet Mask

“This mask is uber hydrating?and since my skin can act like a sad, neglected sponge in the winter, absorbing my daily moisturizer so fast it’s like I never even applied it, uber hydrating is exactly what I need.”? Sally Holmes, ELLE.com Executive Editor

Tonymoly Master Lab Sheet Mask (Set of 2), $9; tonymoly.us


GlamGlow Supermud Clearing Treatment

“When it comes to masking, I’m all about instant gratification. This tingly, menthol-scented charcoal mask targets breakouts and shrinks pores (albeit temporarily) in just 15 minutes with a mix of mandelic, glycolic, lactic, and salicylic acids.”? Julie Schott, ELLE.com Beauty Director

GlamGlow Supermud Clearing Treatment, $22; sephora.com


The Body Shop Amazonian Acai Energizing Radiance Masque

“This mask is pretty, firstly, and smells good. If you saw it out of the jar, I’m pretty sure I could convince you it’s homemade. So many masks I’ve tried have barely noticeable effects (and maybe it’s just a placebo thing), but this one leaves my skin glowing as soon as I rinse it off.”? Leah Melby-Clinton, ELLE.com Senior Editor in Branded Content

The Body Shop Amazonian Acai Energizing Radiance Masque, $28; thebodyshop-usa.com


Zelens Transformer Instant Renewal Mask

“For skin that’s starting to look as drab as February feels, nothing works for me like Zelens Transformer Instant Renewal Mask. I smear it on, usually widely blow the 15 minute mark, and let the silky, sticky mask do its thing (it’s thing being, according to the company, increasing oxygen to skin cells and giving a little cellular boost with marine glycogen and vitamin C for glow). Not only does my skin feel uber hydrated, the mask is also gentle enough on my face to use more than once a week.”? Cotton Codinha, Associate Beauty and Fitness Editor

Zelens Transformer Instant Renewal Mask, $175; zelens.com


Fresh Rose Face Mask

“New York City’s elements are harsh year round, but this mask helps fight whatever it throws my way. In the dead of winter when my skin is looking more tired and dull then ever, the rose infused gel gives it a moisture boost, and reminds me of warmer days. It also has a cooling and calming effect – making it perfect to use after a day at the beach – or Central Park.” ? Mariel Tyler, Photo Editor

Fresh Rose Face Mask, $62; fresh.com


Source: http://www.elle.com/beauty/makeup-skin-care/a25480/best-drug-store-face-masks/